Starting an LLC for a Handyman BusinessIf you’re a handyman, you’ve probably at least considered forming a limited liability company (LLC) for your business. The LLC is a popular option for all sorts of businesses looking for asset protection, and it has a handful of other major advantages as well.

Of course, forming an LLC isn’t the only option for your handyman business, so our mission is to help you decide if it’s the best choice for you. There are many different factors to consider when you’re forming a business entity as a handyman, so let’s dive into the details of the LLC to figure out if you should form one for your business.

What Is an LLC?

First off, let’s quickly outline what an LLC is. LLCs are formal legal entities that are typically taxed similarly to sole proprietorships and general partnerships, in that the owners include any company profits or losses into their personal returns — the LLC itself does not owe income taxes. An LLC may also elect to be taxed like a corporation, although this is not a very common option.

There are similarities to corporations too, especially when it comes to financial responsibilities. In an LLC, the owners or members are not usually personally accountable for the financial status of the business. This means that if someone sues your LLC, your personal assets are not at risk.

Why Starting an LLC for a Handyman Business Is Important

Personal Asset Protection

The top reason to form an LLC for a handyman is to gain access to the personal asset protection provided by this business structure. Whether you operate your business as a solo handyman or you’ve partnered with other people in this trade, you need the limited liability protections that an LLC can provide.

As an example, let’s say that you incorrectly repair a faucet for a customer. That customer turns on the faucet and water spills out in every direction, ruining their flooring and cabinetry. If you operate your handyman business as a sole proprietorship or general partnership, your personal assets — like your house, car, personal bank accounts, etc. — would be at risk if that customer decides to sue your business.

On the other hand, if you form an LLC for your handyman business, and you operate and maintain that LLC in a compliant fashion, the scope of your customer’s lawsuit will be limited to your business assets. In other words, your personal assets will be protected by the business structure you’ve chosen.

Taxation

However, this is just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to the advantages of the LLC for a handyman. Another important aspect is taxation. The LLC actually provides its owners with a selection of options regarding how they want the business to be taxed, which can save you a considerable amount of money compared to simply operating as an informal business entity.

Sole Proprietorship/General Partnership

Your handyman LLC can be taxed as a sole proprietorship (for single-member LLCs) or general partnership (for multi-member LLCs), which is the default option. With this tax structure, your handyman business itself does not pay taxes, but rather the profits are passed through the business entity and your owners pay taxes on that money when they file their own personal taxes.

C Corporation

You can also choose for your handyman business to be taxed as a C corporation, although this option isn’t very popular because it subjects your business to what’s known as double taxation — meaning that your profits are taxed first on the corporate level and again on the personal level when they’re distributed to your owners.

S Corporation

The other option is S corporation taxation. There are quite a few limitations to electing S corp taxation, but most handymen have no trouble meeting these requirements — your business cannot have more than 100 owners, they all must be either residents or citizens of the United States, etc.

S corp taxation can help your handyman business save money by reducing your self-employment tax burden. Instead of paying self-employment taxes (a 15.3% tax that includes the employer and employee portions of Medicare and Social Security) on all of your business income, you can pay yourself and your co-owners a reasonable salary for your roles and only pay self-employment tax on that portion of your income, while you can reinvest the rest of it into your business without paying this tax.

Compared to operating a sole proprietorship or general partnership as a handyman, the S corp taxation model can save you quite a bit of cash that you can use to buy materials and tools for your handyman business, rather than writing a big check to Uncle Sam.

Enhanced Credibility and Name Uniqueness

Finally, an LLC structure can enhance the credibility of your handyman business venture. Informal business entities don’t have exclusive assumed business names and typically operate under the personal name(s) of their owner(s). For instance, if your name is Johnny Smith and you operate a handyman sole proprietorship, your company’s name is also “Johnny Smith,” which obviously isn’t a great name for a handyman business.

In this scenario, you could register a DBA (doing business as) name to give your business the ability to operate under an assumed business name, but DBAs have no exclusivity regarding their naming rights in many states. This means that if another handyman wants to use your DBA name as their own, they’re not only allowed to do so, but they can actually register a formal business entity with that name, preventing you from continuing to use your own assumed name.

With an LLC, you not only have the rights to exclusive use of a business name, but you will also have either the phrase “limited liability company” or the letters “LLC” in that business name. This provides your business with a jolt of respectability because customers respect the professionalism displayed by an LLC. Also, they typically feel more comfortable writing checks to a business entity rather than to an individual.

How to Start a Handyman LLC

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The formation process for LLCs varies depending on which state you’re forming one in, but in general, the process has some universal steps that need to be taken no matter what state your business is located in. If you want a comprehensive overview of all the steps required to form an LLC, check out our complete guide on the topic. The basic steps in the LLC formation process in any state are as follows:

1) Choose an LLC name

Coming up with the perfect name for your new LLC is an important step. You’ll need to choose a name that represents your company and describes what you do, and you’ll also have to make sure it isn’t already in use by checking your state’s business database.

2) Designate a registered agent

Your LLC’s registered agent (which can be an individual or a professional service) is responsible for receiving important document deliveries from the state — like service of process, annual report reminders, etc. — and forwarding them to you. The registered agent ensures that the state always has a reliable point of contact for your business.

3) File your formation documents with the state

The form used to create an LLC is usually called the Articles of Organization, although the name can vary (some states call it the Certificate of Formation or something similar). You’ll need to provide the state with some basic information about your business and its owners. In exchange, the state will formally create your LLC.

4) Acquire an EIN

The Employer Identification Number (EIN) is a federal tax ID number that essentially functions as a Social Security number for a business. The EIN allows your business to hire employees, pay taxes, apply for bank loans, and more. You can easily obtain an EIN from the Internal Revenue Service free of charge.

5) Create an LLC operating agreement

Most states don’t require operating agreements but every LLC should have one regardless. This is an internal document that outlines several key operational aspects of your LLC. The value of the operating agreement is how it can help prevent ownership disputes down the line by clearly explaining how the LLC will be run.

6) Create a financial infrastructure

You will need a business bank account for your LLC, and you’ll probably want a business credit card for work-related expenses as well. It’s also a good idea to use accounting software like QuickBooks or even hire an accountant to handle your bookkeeping for you.

7) Handle taxes, licenses, and permits

Depending on your state, you may need a general business license to operate your LLC in compliance with state requirements. There is no federal industry-specific handyman license, but many states do have licensing requirements for anyone wanting to operate a handyman business. Don’t forget to check with your state to see if there are franchise or privilege taxes assessed on LLCs, and also see if your municipal and/or county government entities have any further licensing requirements.

8) Understand maintenance requirements (annual reports, franchise taxes, etc.)

Again, these requirements can vary by state, but most states require some sort of regular report to ensure that your LLC’s info is up-to-date in the state’s business database. Some states require reports each year, while others only require them biannually or not at all. No matter what your state requires, you’ll need to stay on top of it to keep your LLC in good standing.

Additional Resources for Starting a Handyman Business

1) How to Start a Handyman Business

There are few websites that provide such a comprehensive overview of starting a handyman business as this one does. The Handyman Business Guide to Success lays out the five steps to success — making the decision, setting up your business, handyman truck and tools, setting your prices, and marketing — making it easy to figure out exactly what you need to do to get your business off the ground.

2) TaskRabbit

Think of TaskRabbit as the Uber of handymen. The TaskRabbit platform is a gig economy app that allows consumers to hire people for small jobs. Popular categories include handymen, cleaning, delivery, furniture assembly, and moving services. TaskRabbit lets you know when there are potential jobs near you, and it lets you set your own rates and only work with the people you choose.

3) Handyman Startup

Handyman Startup advertises their site as a way to “turn your skills into a six-figure income,” and they back it up with a broad selection of resources to help you get your business up and running. Take a look at their site if you need more information on pricing, marketing, getting started, or thinking bigger.

4) Mr. Handyman

Mr. Handyman is a well-known national franchise of handymen, but the portion of their website we linked is to their tremendous “checklists and resources” page. Their checklists give you step-by-step instructions on how to put together the perfect set of tools to complete any common handyman job, and we recommend it to any professional or amateur handyman.

Frequently Asked Questions

What liability risks do handyman businesses face?

As a handyman, you face potential liability issues every time you work on a project. If you damage a customer’s property while doing some work for them, they could sue you for the damages.

In addition, injuries due to improperly built or repaired work could add up to thousands of dollars in medical bills in a hurry. In short, every handyman business should form an LLC to protect the owners’ personal assets.

Why should I form an LLC instead of a corporation?

Everyone’s situation is different, and we are not here to provide legal advice. That said, the limited liability company has some concrete advantages over the corporation that makes it the preferred option for most small businesses. Corporations tend to have more complex formation and maintenance requirements, and they don’t have the taxation advantages of an LLC. The corporation has some advantages of its own (for example, it’s easier to attract investors to a corporation) that make it worth a look but the LLC is a simpler and more flexible business structure.

Can I serve as my LLC’s registered agent?

You certainly can! Every state allows entrepreneurs to serve as their own registered agents. However, while the role of the registered agent can seem like that of an unnecessary middleman, there is more complexity to this position than some people realize.

For instance, you would need to be present and available at your business location during all standard business hours. In addition, if you serve as your LLC’s registered agent, you may need to make your home address a matter of public record. Not only does this have privacy concerns, but there’s also the matter of unwanted junk mail as well.

Why should I hire an LLC service when I can form my own LLC?

The DIY route is always an option for LLC formation. However, LLC services are so affordable that there’s really no good reason not to use one these days. In addition, some of these companies often throw in free bonus features that make them an even better bargain.

Should I form my LLC in my home state, or choose a state like Delaware or Wyoming?

Some people like to form their LLCs in states with favorable legal settings. For instance, Delaware is often seen as the most business-friendly state, as it has an entire court system that’s dedicated solely to business matters. As for Wyoming, this state has some of the most generous anonymity laws for LLC ownership.

However, for most people, your best option is to simply form your business in your home state. Forming in a different state can be a tremendous hassle, and it can add some unnecessary complexity to tax issues as well.

How much does it cost to form an LLC?

The costs of LLC formation can vary quite a bit depending on which state you’re forming one in. For in-depth information about LLC formation costs in your specific state, take a look at our comprehensive guide to state-by-state expenses.

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